New Projects to Benefit Soil Health

Dec 18, 2015

The Burnett Mary Regional Group (BMRG) has just announced 16 new soil health projects occurring on properties in the region’s inland areas over the next few months.

BMRG Project Officer Ann McKenzie said projects have been developed for both grazing and cropping enterprises and covered a range of soil health improvement strategies. 

“The funding for these projects is provided by the Queensland Government and is being managed by BMRG, recognising that healthy soils are crucial to keeping our agricultural areas productive and equally important when it comes to protecting our environment,” Ms McKenzie said.

“Farmers are keen to maintain and improve the health of their soils but many find it challenging from a financial point of view,” Ms McKenzie said.

“We offer grants up to $5000 with the landholder providing inkind contributions to the project.  Without this financial incentive most would probably not be able to undertake the project at the current time,” she said.

Grazing projects include the protection of creek areas by installing watering points (troughs) away from these environmentally sensitive areas; fencing land types, creeks and divisional fencing to better manage grazing pressure, allowing areas to be rested which ultimately improves ground cover and pasture quality while protecting the soil from erosion.

“Some of these projects will also directly combat gully erosion through the rehabilitation of eroded areas and installation of structures to stabilise the area, slowing overland water flow down and protecting the fragile soil,” Ms McKenzie said.

Cropping projects will address soil acidification through the use of lime, increasing controlled traffic precision and reducing soil compaction.

“Project sites were chosen based upon a strict eligibility criteria, with soil type, slope and location all considered so as to maximise the benefits to the environment.

“Ultimately these project will address soil health across an area greater than 6,000 ha with the added benefit to the environment of downstream areas protected from the input of extra sediment and nutrients,” said Ms McKenzie.

ENDS

 

MEDIA ENQUIRES: Chris Stone

 

TELEPHONE: 07 4181 2999 (ext 205)

 

EMAIL:  chris.stone@bmrg.org.au

The Burnett Mary Regional Group (BMRG) has just announced 16 new soil health projects occurring on properties in the region’s inland areas over the next few months.

 

BMRG Project Officer Ann McKenzie said projects have been developed for both grazing and cropping enterprises and covered a range of soil health improvement strategies. 

 

“The funding for these projects is provided by the Queensland Government and is being managed by BMRG, recognising that healthy soils are crucial to keeping our agricultural areas productive and equally important when it comes to protecting our environment,” Ms McKenzie said.

 

“Farmers are keen to maintain and improve the health of their soils but many find it challenging from a financial point of view,” Ms McKenzie said.

 

“We offer grants up to $5000 with the landholder providing inkind contributions to the project.  Without this financial incentive most would probably not be able to undertake the project at the current time,” she said.

 

Text Box: Fencing off areas to restrict access to cattle helps to limit erosion which creates an added environmental benefit by reducing sediment and nutrient runoff improving downstream water quality.Grazing projects include the protection of creek areas by installing watering points (troughs) away from these environmentally sensitive areas; fencing land types, creeks and divisional fencing to better manage grazing pressure, allowing areas to be rested which ultimately improves ground cover and pasture quality while protecting the soil from erosion.

 

“Some of these projects will also directly combat gully erosion through the rehabilitation of eroded areas and installation of structures to stabilise the area, slowing overland water flow down and protecting the fragile soil,” Ms McKenzie said.

 

Cropping projects will address soil acidification through the use of lime, increasing controlled traffic precision and reducing soil compaction.

 

“Project sites were chosen based upon a strict eligibility criteria, with soil type, slope and location all considered so as to maximise the benefits to the environment.

 

“Ultimately these project will address soil health across an area greater than 6,000 ha with the added benefit to the environment of downstream areas protected from the input of extra sediment and nutrients,” said Ms McKenzie.

 

 

 

ENDS

 

MEDIA ENQUIRES: Chris Stone

 

TELEPHONE: 07 4181 2999 (ext 205)

 

EMAIL:  chris.stone@bmrg.org.au



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